The best ‘Bowls of Ramen’

in Astoria

Japanese Causal

Dining Café

Tamashii stands

for high quality food,

prepared daily

ABOUT US

Tamashii Restaurant- A Ramen Lovers Dream

Tamashii Restaurant was established in 2013 and was the first restaurant to bring Japanese ramen to the residents in Astoria, New York. Japanese ramen is one of the most popular dishes in New York. It is now offered in a number of restaurants throughout the city; however, Tamashii Restaurant remains a favorite among diners. One of the most popular dishes at Tamashii Restaurant is Miso Ramen. This soybean-flavored ramen comes with delectable toppings. Two other popular ramens are the Shio Ramen made with mineral salt and Shoyu Ramen made with soy sauce. If you like spicy dishes, why not try the Tan-Tan Men, a spicy sesame flavored ramen. This dish has captured the attention of New Yorkers. In addition to these dishes, there is a full line of ramen choices, including Japanese Curry, Vegetable ramen, Donburi (Beef bowl, Gyu-don, and Katsu-Don), Takoyaki, Teriyaki, and Onigiri. Each guest will be heartily welcomed by the amazing staff.

What is Ramen?

Traditional RAMEN consists of three main components: Stock, noodle and “kaeshi”. Tamashii restaurant brings the tradition of ramen to New York City.

Soup

Tamashii soup is made daily using whole chicken and 5 different vegetables which are simmered together for 14 hours. More than 3 types of seafood and medicinal herbs are added for a well-rounded taste and for better absorption of nutrients into the body.

Our Values

1. We use mineral salt.
2. We use tamari soy sauce, a special soy sauce that was reserved for Japanese royalty.
(No wheat addition)
3. We use hatcho miso, 100% soy beans that been fermented for 2 years. It is then mixed with 12 beneficial ingredients and fermented for another month to make our miso paste.
4. We always try to use the best ingredients to make the most nutritious meal for our customers.
5. Excellent customer experience.

THE BLOG

08
Dec

6 Kinds Of Ramen That You Should Know About

1. Shio

When it comes to Ramen, this salty broth is perhaps the oldest of them all. Shio translates to “salt” and sea salt is likely the first type of seasoning that was ever used in making Ramen.
Continue Reading..

30
Nov

Do You Know How To Drink Sake?

There can be a number of common questions that come from a sake beginner, including:

Should sake be consumed warm, cold, or at room temperature?

What kind of a glass or cup should you be using for drinking sake?

Chill Or Not To Chill?

The truth is that there is no solid rule to follow. The more important considerations will be the type of sake that is in question, as well as your own personal preferences.

Some sakes will be at their best in terms of taste when you serve them cold, while others will be just perfect when you serve them warmed. Each sake is going to be different, and the connoisseurs of sake will tell you that you need to experiment. Do whatever tastes best to you. It is never going to be fun if you are more worried about whether or not you are drinking it wrong.

With that being said, there are some general guidelines that you can use to help you in either warming or cooling your sake:

– Talk with the staff at the shop, bar or restaurant that you are at about a recommendation, as they will know whether it will be best warm or cold.

– Avoid any extremes. Whether your are chilling it or warming it, you never want to overdo it. Overheating or getting it too cold could disrupt the aromas or flavors of the sake.

– Warming: Never heat the sake directly. Instead, you should be pouring it into a receptacle that can take some heat. You can heat it gradually in a water bath. Just avoid heating it too intensely or too quickly, which means you should never microwave it.

Without trying to overgeneralize, a great deal of sake experts will say that daiginjo and ginjo sakes will be best not warmed. Being chilled will enhance the aromas and flavors. many of the honjozo and junmai sakes will be fine either way. Warming these will bring out the smooth nature and complex flavors.

Various sakes will taste wonderful at different temperatures, as the differing temps will bring out differing characteristics. This is what makes them worthwhile if you are looking to experiment a bit.

Kind Words

  • My first ramen outside of Manhattan and it did not disappoint! I’ve been to the famous Totto Ramen a lot in Hell’s Kitchen but I actually think this is nicer! Went here with my brother and we both left very impressed!

    Tom B.
  • Consistently delicious. The croquette appetizer is my favorite followed by the ramen. The miso is too creamy and flavorful for my own taste. Only $2 for extra noodles! This is a great local spot. Their location is convenient and they’re always busy.

    Annabelle D.
  • There are 3 things I look for in an awesome ramen shop.

    1) broth – must be flavorful and not too oily. can’t have hella fat chunks
    2) noodles – thicker and more el dente in texture. I like having chewy noodles
    3) eggs – must be soft boiled and running eggs.

    So my ramen covered 1 & 3 but I forgot to ask for the thick noodles, which is my fault not the ramen shop’s. They had it too. boo.

    Cynthia C.
  • I’ve been here for about three times now and Tamashi Ramen definitely hits the spot. Now only if they can deliver. Each time we go there the usual is the tako wasabi. My husband and I we both love the Kara spicy miso Ramen. The noodles are nice thick and wavy al dente. Very delicious to the bite! The chasu pork is yummy, filling and very substantial. I love the tiny piece of pork and corn that included with the soft boiled egg. If only I could fit more in my tummy I would definitely wanna try other items outside of Ramen.

    Sourivone V.